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the madness arena at the university of colorado. im jim lehrer of the pbs "newshour." i welcome you to the 2012 debates between barack obama, the democratic nominee and former massachusetts governor, mitt romney, the republican nominee. this debate in the next three, two presidential, one vice presidential are sponsored by the commission on presidential debates. tonight's 90 minutes will be about domestic issues that will follow a format designed by the commission. there will be six roughly 15 minute segment with two-minute answers for the first question, then open discussion for the remainder of each segment. thousands of people offered suggestions on segment subjects or questions via the internet and other means, but i made the final selections. and for the record, they were not submitted for approval to the commission or the candidates. the segments as i announced in a van will be three on the economy and one each on health care, the role of government and governing, with an emphasis throughout the difference is, specific century says. both candidates will also have two-minute cl
the reagan agenda. jim baker and others, very strong legislative affairs office. and really ability, it was impressive what they did we look back on, picking up 70, 80 democrats in the house. we look at history, reagan won and, therefore, inevitably going to get all the stuff, that's not how the code works. it will be worth looking at those. >> governor ronny wilson have difficulty. just a change of administration. and a confirmation process right now is awful. and so you probably will have to have the new term for czars are, that are in the administration trying to kabul together the jurisdiction of greece agencies to push whatever needs to be done. spent i'd like to involve our audience here, so if you have a question raise your hand. we have a question over here. we have a microphone over here, if you can take it over here. if you can give us your name and your organization. we would ask you to keep your questions brief so we can get to as many people as possible. >> there was al gore's reinventing government, but really what it comes down, no matter who is elected, the president
to know in his quarter century as the country's go to referee for the presidential debate. mr. jim lehrer the former anchor of pbs news hour has been seizing outreach by the suggestion that he was as safe and uninspired choice to moderate the first debate and he's offended by the reports that question whether the 12 presidential debate might bone too many. they say in this election living by a journalist doctrine of disengagement of reporter is never the story that has been harder than ever especially for those moderating debates. they go to because reassure the individual will be the moderators. we see martha raddatz but correspondent for abc news and will moderate the vice presidential debate and is the only moderator chosen who is not an anchor. candy crowley the host of the state of the union program on cnn will host one of the debates, and bob schiffer the cbs correspondent and a host of face the nation. tomorrow night they are hosting -- there are other stories in the people looking at the candidates and to do. "the chicago tribune" says the gop may hinge on the debate in showdown c
hours. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, ladies and gentlemen. i'm jim marshall the new president of the substitute of peace. i'm delighted to tell you. and i'm also pleased that everyone is here today for a very important -- to hear about a important project that has been sponsored. my job is to introduce steven heydemann. steve is the senior adviser for middle east initiative. he taught at colombia. he is published and directed if the senator for democracy and civil society at georgetown university. steve is terrific asset to the institute. the project is one that it driven by syrians. with assistance technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute in a sister constitution in germany. it's very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations. things that are handed down from the united states typical don't work all that well. and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions. and steve, if i can turn this over to you. >> thank you very much. thank you very much for opening us this morning. and
or are they being more clear eyed in the assessment of it? >> they're being more clear eyed, jim. some private grumbling about jim lehrer. you're hearing some people say with the halperin quote you said, kind of downplaying the significance of this thing. most people made up their minds. you're hearing what mike mentioned a few minutes ago, people saying yeah, romney did well stylelisticly but not substantively. i can tell you on the republican side i'm sensing real confidence. the republicans are the first people to get in the spin room. they came pouring in with their placards during the closing statements. obama people came a couple minutes later much more aggressive. i've been trying not to just talk to romney campaigners and republicans not closely associated with romney campaign people like al cardenas, chairman of the american conservative union, rudy giuliani, not always a mitt romney fan. they're all telling me they really think the dynamic of the race shifted a little bit. we'll see how much. the spirit is high among republicans and it seems relatively authentic. >> james writes a pr
it is so polarized and more democrats, moving the question. jim politely it is referred to as the pollster conspiracy. if you saw a bunch of pollsters trying to decide where they wanted to go for lunch you would soon realize they couldn't do anything but that is a different matter. pollsters don't search party id. >> public polls because there are some polls -- >> good polls are not setting party id because it itself varies from election to election. people say they will vote more democrat or republican. it varies in a particular poll that dick morris was referring to. we had 2% more in ohio democratic but at the same time we asked 1% more republican and 1% more in florida. he picked that one to take a pot shots at. more recent poll had more republicans than in 2008. the long and short is there is no standard party id. comparison to 2008 is itself a comparison to the exit polls and party id does vary from election to election. if you use 2004 you would be surprised to find more democratic, we are finding it a little less democratic than in 2008. we had a group over the weekend last weekend
and learning programs. and i appreciate that. >> jim walsh, a lawyer in austin, and i have the opportunity to speak to educators either written word or spoken word every day. and influence them positively. but i'm jen, my background is health care and real estate. i can help students with a strong work ethic and the benefit of helping others and being successful in giving back to the community. >> i'm carol field with i.t. services and we support quite a few nonprofits in town. for instance, ballet austin we provide three educational opportunities there for people to learn about the arts. >> i'm ted, and through my day job as a co-owner of a publishing company with jim, we communicate to school administrators best practices throughout at least texas and beyond. as a parent of an 11 year old especially in a 15 year old, to a degree, i can every day help each of them learn. i think that role is one that probably each of us can do to some degree. >> absolutely. >> i am dr. linda wilkinson, and i have worked both in the corporate world, real estate and education. and i think i can live in and
have a microphone? hold on a second. let's get a microphone to you, thank you. >> i'm jim talent with northstar policy, consulting and lobbying. we've talked about energy. i think we have enormous potential in the united states to devote our energy resources. it seems to me a lot of it is communications challenged. i mean, when you have a lisa doesn't mean you're going to find before. we talk about anwr for example, having enormous reserves but it takes a long time to actually find energy and develop it. is very expensive. how do we better communicate that to the average citizen in just its? i think that will be the key in order for us to have a sound energy policy and develop our resources that could benefit really all americans. >> well, you know, we, the chamber is very active in politics but we don't to presidential politics. but i am going to refer to something that candidate romney said the other day about energy. and he said if you spend all your time and energy beating up on the existing energy system, which does a hell of a job, about $2 trillion worth of deductions, whi
morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to the institute. this project is one that is driven by syria with assistance, technical assistance and other kinds of assistance from the institute and sister institution in germany. it is very important that these kinds of efforts be driven by local populations, things that are handed down from the united states that typically don't work all that well and so we are very pleased that you're all here. i hope you have lots of questions and steve if i could turn this over to you. >> thank you very much gem for opening this
for voters who would like to see us return to the good old days of jim crow. >> yeah, we are really anti-black. colonel allen west is anti-black, connie rice's anti-black, they are all publicly anti-black. msnbc daytime anchor. yes, i want you to note that. he's an actual anchor on this network that i used to work for called msnbc. his name is thomas roberts and he was online september 23rd to comment on the previous night gop debates. and when i think about msnbc time i actually think of how many people work on each of their shows. and i think there are more staffers working for the shows than there are people watching the shows. and nevertheless, mr. roberts takes it away. >> i get out of all of these things for many candidates have rather take legislation to build a time machine and go back in time to where we had, you know, no women voting, slavery was cool. >> in other words, republicans are troglodytes. liberals are so perpetually better informed. tom roberts. our third and final nominee for the 2012 dishonors knuckle drag her award is an well, how can it not be? i don't know about
. and now i'd like to hand the floor over to jim corpsville of stony brook university who will lead our plenary panel asking, is this any way to cover an election? >> thank you, a.j., and good morning to everybody. we have a very distinguished and knowledgeable panel to talk about this topic, the timing, obviously, couldn't be better, debates wednesday night. let me introduce the people on the panel. to my immediate right is michael howe who's the technical cofounder of the fourth of state project as well as the architect of the platform that runs both enterprises. the project focuses on driving media coverage of the election 2012. and i think he'll have a very interesting powerpoint presentation to make to us. to my immediate left is amy davidson, senior editor at the new yorker. she's been at the magazine since 1995, writes a blog and contributes to the magazine's pages. next is anna sale who's a political reporter for wnyc radio politics site, it's a free she covered the gop primaries, my condolences -- [laughter] and focuses on swing states far away from political ralli
>> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. i'm jim milngto it's about 40 minutes. >> library of congress who enjog this extraordinary national book festival. [applause] >> we have involved more authors than at any time in the 12 year history of this festival, and it's for them we're especially thankful. your responses make the free public event possible, and one of them is the wells fargo, which has been the sponsor of this particular pavilion, history and biography. in a moment, i introduce to you michael l. golden, wells fargo's regional president for greater washington, d.c., who will introduce our closing authors today. we're privileged to have with him, of course, not only an extraordinary biographer but also the two inheritors of the legacy of the man who is not only led what is often called the greatest generation to victory in the world war ii, but also led the country to eight years of peace and prosperity, which are now becoming recognized in good part thanks to these authors we have with us today, to close things out. being recognized by historians for the contribu
and possibility and sacrifice. i wonder if you could go back. you were raised in the jim crow south in baker county and you were puzzled -- trying to get gangsters' driving a tractor -- strength in the neighborhood. >> we were in baker county. you read about the sheriffs of earlier years. the sheriff in our county wanted to be known as the gator. the gator ruled everything everyone in the county. you can't imagine looking at a lesson from earlier days, anyone like him but he was worse than you have seen but growing up in that, my family lived -- my great grandparents had come to baker county. don't know if they came as wav or not but ended up as sharecroppers with the intent of buying land and that they did. they bought enough land that the area i grew up is called hawkinstown. lots of family -- it was that way. they live in one area -- we were all one big family and felt we had to help each other. i was raised on the farm and my father -- there were five girls -- any farmer wants a son, and the man wants a son. my mother and father kept having babies and they were all girls. we all had boys
you, jim. the republicans meant a great deal before he left, both the week prior, during about what requirements going back home, the only requirement that the people want is that congress be here working. we are here and prepared to work. 14 million people that are out of work demand that congress be here working so that we can put donation back to work. we just came from a conference that was most informative than personal. want to see if you're working because they understand on a very personal level what this means as the leader says one medicare, social security, and in fact obamacare are all on the ballot and what that is to the american people. we are here to work. now the vice chair of the caucus, xavier becerra. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i would like to echo what those who have spoken before me have said they simply reiterating some in that we all know. if you believe in america, you invest in america. not in the cayman islands, not in swiss bank accounts, that here in america. the president made this clear in his state of the union address some of the year ago
away from jim crow. i think the black community is more tentative to push the way i think we need to if this president gets reelected. >> i think you're right. we are pushed from the inside more than from the outside. and another four years i think we would tend to push more from the outside. you talked earlier -- >> another four years? >> the next four years. the one following -- >> you said four more years. >> no, no. [laughter] spent we have concentrated -- >> a big difference. >> right. you talked about our probably thinking more in terms of national elections then those. it's been a matter of resources. to use the national congress of black women has been organizing over these three years, as we only had maybe 20 or less chapters three years ago, four years ago. we have 100 no. we are more equipped to work on the local level and we have many black women that we're pushing in local and congressional elections. >> i want to bring up what the spring marches we saw 2006. i moderated an event, i think alice, your group, media folks in las vegas. and i pushed them and i challenged
the grandmother and build new education and yet segregation, jim crow law rose above it and insisted that his grandson's rise above its. fight, participate, eliminate but do not be consumed by it. in so many ways we talk about the founding fathers and yet the house fell in a way because of the contradiction and the generation rebuilds it. frederick others see -- frederick and others. do we today in our law and our culture give enough credit to that refunding? >> you think of the great moments in our history. we talk about of course the revolution, certainly the constitution that we celebrate now, 225 years. it was all coming apart and the country as we know today is reshaped after the civil war. the constitutional law what would it look like if there were no 14th amendment to the states. there is so much that goes beyond the war. i tell my clerks we have to go to gettysburg. this isn't just about pulling these little threads out of what we do every day about journalism and original was on and we argue it is much bigger than that. i see some people here who argue before the court. i'm not once
on mars. jim rice, a geologist on the mission, said i put myself out there in the theme, the rover, with two boots on the ground trying to figure out what -- where to go and what to do. how to make that what we're observing with the instruments. day in and day out it was always a perspective of being on the surface and trying to draw on your own field experience in places that might be similar. david demoray described it this way. the first few months of the mission they had these huge charts on the wall engineering drawings of the rover with all of these dimensions. we'd have some geometric question, well, can we see this? can we reach that? is this rock going to be if shade, or will it be in the sun? we'd go and we'd stand, and we'd stare at those charts. and over time we stopped doing it so much because we began to gain a sense of the body. that's projecting yourself into the rover. it's just an amazing capability of the human minds that you can sort of retool yourself. so acting through the robots they control, the scientists look around, they manipulate materials, and they mov
presidential debate tomorrow at the university of denver. the live debate gets underway at 7 eastern, and jim leher moderates, and after the debate, your reactions and comments taking your calls, e-mails and tweets on c-span, c-span radio, and online at >> i have all the channels, house, senate, plus author and book review, speeches, those kinds of if i know a bill's coming up on the floor in the house, i watch, you know, which channel want to see because i have them all. if there is either a speech i know that you've covered or a book review or so on, i'm going to watch that. when i want to find out something that has some value to it, that's going to be one of the first places i look. i mean, i'm obviously a public broadcasting fan. i watch those channels. out of a couple hundred channels, i probably have five to ten at the most i go to. it's going to include all the c-span channels. >>> david brugger watches c-span on direct tv. c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979 brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> agenting faa administ
and mitt romney meet in the first presidential debate. news hour jim moderates from the university of denver. watch and debate with c-span followed by two ways to watch the debate at nine. on c-span both candidates on screen the entire debate. and on c-span2, the multicamera version of the debate. and following, your reactions, calls, e mailings and and tweets. follow the live coverage on c-span, c-span radio and online at see the first presidential debate love on c-span, c-span radio and watch and engage. coming up tonight, the carnegie endowment for international peace hosts a decision discussion on the role of the u.s. president in the world and declining. eric can ton faces his economic challenger in a seventh district debate. that's followed by libertarian presidential candidate gary johnson on the obstacle of faces a third party candidate. >>> on washington journal tomorrow morning, we'll exam the health care law that presidential candidates mitt romney signed in to law when he was governor of massachusetts. our guests is boston herald reporting christ
was pretty -- i was stunned at how the moderator, jim lehrer, let himself get walked over by the candidates in terms of the timing. it was like the two minutes didn't matter. barack obama woods along. when i'm about to die i want barack obama's five seconds because they lasted forever. [laughter] on the other hand, i thought it was pretty good. there's so much policy in this debate. both of these people show they are very smart people and that they both you know can be president, won by virtue of being present in the other by virtue of -- i don't know if there are differences in the formats in the next two. i haven't looked that far ahead. but, i thought it worked out really well in terms of the back-and-forth. it was more of a gnat -- actual debate then a dinner talk or something. >> i think as they political follower like all of you are, i like to the elastic time constraints. i think sometimes in too many debates, i mean just let them talk. i don't think the format of the debate affected the performance of either candidate. it was what it was. i think mr. lehrer did a terrific job and i
be the model before he decided he didn't like the reagan agenda, and jim baker and others in the white house knew what they were doing, very strong legislative affairs office and really the ability to -- we look back picking up 70 or 80 democrats in the house even though it was a pretty strong speaker and, you know, being able to get that stuff through -- we look at history retrospective reagan won the and he's never going to get all this stuff through. that is and how the world works and the fact that he did was pretty startling looking at that as a model i suppose. >> governor romney is also going to have a difficulty, just a change in the administration. and the confirmation process now is just awful, you probably will have to have those whatever the new term for czars are that are in the administration trying to cobble together this jurisdiction of the agency's to push a lever needs to be done. >> i would like to involve the audience comes if you have a question raise your hand. we have a microphone over here if you can take it over here. if you can give your name and your organization.
's an honest man. >> i do. >> he lied to jim lehrer to his face. i think you can be an honest person and lie about any number of things to respect he said, you know, it's a dumb thing that he is doing, but i've been a dumbass all my life. >> dan rather. all right. let it. that's what we want to be the that's what we want. our second finalist is arguably the most pretentious of the lot. a man who loses evidence, the kind of a grandiose self importance born from so many years struggling in the trenches, reading sports scores on a teleprompter. yes, bryant gumbel, you've always been a pompous ass, and if you're lucky tonight he will win a new trophy, the worst reporter in the history of man. roll the tape. >> largely as a result of the policy and priorities of the ronald reagan administration more people are becoming poorer and staying power in this country than any time since world war ii. >> wednesday morning the day when the budget picture focus seems gloomier than ever and it's time to pay for the cost of the reagan years. let's not debate his presidency for his passing as opposed to a man
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)